Overview

Microelectronic devices and circuits are the fundamental building blocks in the communication and information technologies that are enabling current and future transformations in energy, embedded systems, medical electronics and large scale systems.

In order to drive research, development and commercialization of future systems, engineers are needed that understand both the underlying semiconductor device and fabrication technology, and the application of these devices in the design of integrated circuits and systems.

The mission of the Microsystems Engineering (MIC) Program is to create a regional and global center of excellence for microelectronics that drives leading-edge research and education both into existing and new directions. These range from state-of-the-art integrated circuit fabrication and foundry technology to novel device concepts, providing new capabilities, to circuits and systems bringing new functionality and capability for critical industrial and global needs including energy and medical technologies.

The Microsystems Engineering Program provides students with the fundamental knowledge, skills and training necessary for successful careers in industrial or academic roles that build upon and extend semiconductor device and integrated circuit technology. Graduates of the program will be well prepared to work collaboratively, conduct independent and multidisciplinary research, communicate effectively and recognize their role in solving global challenges through the development of new technologies and applications.

Program Goals
The MSc in Microsystems Engineering Program aims to produce post-graduate students with the disciplinary preparation that meets the following goals:

  • An ability to identify and address current and future microelectronics and devices, photonics, and micromechanical (collectively, Microsystems) engineering problems related to data communication, health and medicine, and energy sources, production, conversion, efficiency, and control within a broader framework of sustainable development;
  • An ability to apply a multi-disciplinary approach to conceive, plan, design, and implement solutions to microsystems engineering problems in the fields of data communication, health and medicine, and energy and sustainability;
  • An understanding of the impact of solutions to data communication, health and medicine, and energy problems in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context; and
  • An understanding of the value of technical and scientific scholarship, service to society, leadership and lifelong learning required to further their career aspirations.
         

Program Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the Microsystems Engineering Master of Science Program, graduates are expected to attain the following outcomes:

  • Successfully apply advanced concepts of fundamental sciences and engineering to identify, formulate and solve complex microsystems engineering problems;
  • Successfully apply advanced concepts of Microsystems Engineering to the analysis, design and development of systems, components, or processes to meet desired needs of society professionally and ethically;
  • Use an advanced approach to design and conduct experiments, and to analyze and interpret data;
  • Assess contemporary issues and research opportunities/challenges related to energy and sustainability and engage in lifelong learning in the field and in the fundamentals of other related disciplines;
  • Use advanced techniques, skills, and modern scientific and engineering software tools for professional practice; and
  • Communicate effectively in written and oral form, both, individually and as a member of a multidisciplinary team.

Objectives & Curriculum

Academics
The academic curriculum for the Microsystems Engineering Program is designed to provide students with fundamental knowledge and rigorous academic training both in "device and process technology" and in "circuit and system design". The core courses in the program develop and deepen knowledge in these directions.

Device and process technology courses include hands-on experience with underlying fabrication processes, fundamentals of semiconductor device physics and the integration of processes for design of advanced devices that can be manufactured. Circuits and systems courses develop strong fundamentals in both digital and analog circuit design, with applications in integrated digital systems and advanced high speed communication systems. Electives enable students to further deepen expertise in manufacturing, microelectromechanical systems, or circuit design.


Research 
Microsystems research at Masdar Institute explores semiconductor devices and fabrication technologies, and the creation of new electronic and photonic circuits and systems concepts. This will provide a means to meet the need for continued performance and manufacturing breakthroughs underlying communication and information systems.

Research into devices and processes involves the design and analysis of novel structures for switching – extending the scaling of devices into the nanoscale, and the development of materials processing and fabrication integration approaches to bring these devices to commercial application, including the integration of photonic and electronic elements. Alternative devices for power conversion, communication, sensing, actuation and new functionalities will be explored.

Research in circuits and systems entails investigating novel architectures for digital, analog and mixed signal processing of information, and for sensing and interacting with the human as well as physical environment. Key areas of circuit research involve alternative analog architectures, and ultralow-power digital circuits for embedded applications.
 Curriculum
All students for all programs are required to take four program core courses. In addition, each student must complete the following:

  • Three elective courses from any program with the approval of advisor
  • One university core course titled Sustainable Energy: Technology, Policy, Economics
  • 24 credits of thesis work
     

Program Core courses

  • MIC501 Micro/Nano Processing Technology
  • MIC502 Digital Systems Laboratory
  • MIC503 Integrated Microelectronic Devices
  • MIC504 Advanced Signal Processing

Courses

MIC501  Micro/Nano Processing Technology –  3 credits
This course covers the theory of fabrication processing common to several types of semiconductor devices. Additionally, alternative and advanced processing methods, case studies of microelectronic, photonic and MEMS devices will be discussed in the context of processing advancements, challenges, and validation. The lab portion of the course involved three lab modules dedicated to fabrication and testing three distinct devices so students get hands-on experience on some of the processes covered in class.
Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in solid-state physics and differential equations, or equivalents


MIC502  Digital Systems Laboratory –  3 credits
This course covers lectures and labs on digital logic, flip flops, FPGAs, counters, timing, synchronization, finite-state machines, and interfacing with analog circuits to prepare students for the design and implementation of a large scale digital or mixed-signal project of their choice. The project could be related to digital filters, games, music, wireless communications, graphics, analog and/or photonic sensors, etc. Verilog is used extensively for describing and implementing digital logic designs. Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises.
Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in circuits and electronics, and signals and systems, or equivalents


MIC503  Integrated Microelectronic Devices –  3 credits
The course covers the physics of microelectronic semiconductor devices for silicon integrated circuit applications. Topics covered include: semiconductor fundamentals, p-n junction, metal-oxide semiconductor structure, metal-semiconductor junction, MOS field-effect transistor, bipolar junction transistor and basics of optoelectronic devices. Emphasis is on physical understanding of device operation through energy band diagrams. Issues in modern device scaling are outlined.
Prerequisites:  Undergraduate course in solid state physics


MIC504  Advanced Signal Processing –  3 credits
This course covers principles and applications of one- and two-dimensional signal processing. The topics include representation, analysis, and design of discrete time signals and systems; discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals; decimation, interpolation, sampling rate conversion, and multirate techniques; discrete Fourier transform, FFT algorithm; spectral analysis; two-dimensional convolution, Fourier transform, discrete Fourier transform, and discrete cosine transform; Image processing basics; Image enhancement techniques; optical signal processing basics; Optical Fourier transforms, optical correlators, and acousto-optic radio-frequency spectrum analyzer.
Prerequisites: Undergraduate course in signals and systems or equivalent, familiarity with Fourier and Laplace transforms and intermediate level understanding of MATLAB


MIC505  Electromagnetic and Applications –  3 credits
Electromagnetics is essential for understanding key concepts in electronics, photonics and micro-electromechanical systems. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided waves; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy.
Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in physics, calculus and differential equations


MIC600  Master Thesis in Microsystems Engineering –  Total 24 credits
The thesis gives students an opportunity to develop and demonstrate their ability to carry out and document a reasonably comprehensive project requiring considerable initiative, creative thought, and a good deal of individual responsibility. The thesis may be a design project, an analytical paper, or experimental work of a technical nature.
Prerequisites: Undergraduate general chemistry and differential equations, or consent of instructor


MIC610   Analysis and Design of Digital Integrated Circuits –  3 credits
This course aims to get students exposed to important issues in high performance digital CMOS circuit design. Analysis of digital circuit components in terms of speed, power consumption, area, and variations will be thoroughly covered. The course also covers the data path design in full custom design methodology, clocking strategy, and the state-of-the art CMOS logic styles. Students will run SPICE simulations and do term projects and homework assignments.
Prerequisites: MIC502 Digital Systems Laboratory, or equivalent, with permission of the instructor


MIC611   Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits –  3 credits
This course covers general circuit level design issues for analog integrated circuits. Techniques for achieving efficient analysis of transistor circuits are presented, along with basic analog building blocks such as single and differential amplifiers, current mirrors, operational amplifiers, samplers, and switched-capacitor networks. Non-idealities such as thermal and 1/f noise, offset variation, and mismatch are discussed, along with techniques to minimize the negative influence of such issues. The basics of higher level building blocks such as Filters, Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog converters will also be presented. Students will gain a significant amount of experience in simulating analog circuits at the transistor level using SPICE and MATLAB.
Prerequisites: MIC503 Integrated Microelectonic Devices, or equivalent, with permission of instructor


MIC612  High Speed Communication Circuits – 3 credits
This course covers circuit level design issues of high speed communication systems, with primary focus being placed on wireless and broadband data link applications. Specific circuit topics include transmission lines, high speed and low noise amplifiers, power amplifiers, VCO's, mixers, power amps, and phase-locked loops. In addition to learning analysis skills for the above items, students will gain a significant amount of experience in simulating RF circuits at the system level using Matlab and CppSim and at the transistor level using SPICE.
Prerequisites: MIC504 Advanced Signal Processing, and MIC611 Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits, or equivalents


MIC613   Analog and Mixed-Signal Design Techniques – 3 credits
This course covers the architecture and circuit level design of key analog and mixed-signal building blocks. Topics covered will include Opamp-RC, Gm-C, and switched capacitor filters, Digital-to-analog converters, Nyquist analog-to-digital converters, and oversampled delta-sigma modulators.
Prerequisites: MIC611 Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits, or equivalent, with permission of instructor


MIC614  Low Energy Biomedical Circuits and Systems – 3 credits
This course aims to get students exposed to important issues in biomedical circuits and systems, particularly focused on energy-efficient design.
The course covers design methodologies of each component of biomedical circuits and system: electrode, readout front-end circuit, ADC, filters, signal processor, communication, and state-of-the-art CMOS circuit implementations.
The topics are tailored to satisfy low energy and safety requirements of biomedical system. Students will run SPICE simulations and do term projects and homework assignments.
Prerequisites: MIC504 Advanced signal Processing, MIC610 Analysis and Design of Digital Integrated Circuits, MIC611 Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits, or equivalents


MIC615  Computer Architecture – 3 credits
This course covers the organization and architecture of computer systems hardware; instruction set architectures; addressing modes; register transfer logic; processor design and computer arithmetic; memory hierarchy; hardware implementations of virtual memory, and input/output control and devices; performance, power and reliability metrics.
Prerequisites: MIC502 Digital Systems Laboratory, and MIC610 Analysis and Design of Digital Integrated Circuits, or equivalents


MIC620  Advanced VLSI Devices - 3 credits
In modern VLSI technologies, MOSFET device electrical characteristics are sensitive to structural details and therefore to fabrication techniques. The class will cover: VLSI device designed and what are the future challenges; effect of fabrication techniques on device electrical performance; TCAD simulation and device design, advanced MOSFET electrostatics and electrodynamics, CMOS performance factors, ITRS roadmap, and advanced semiconductor memories.
Prerequisites: MIC501 Micro/Nano Processing Technology, and MIC503 Integrated Microelectronic Devices, or equivalents


MIC621  Advanced Integrated Circuits Technology –  3 credits
This course explores the following questions: What are the practical and fundamental limits to the evolution of the technology of modern MOS devices and interconnects? How are modern devices and circuits fabricated and what future changes are likely? Advanced techniques and models of devices and back-end (interconnect and contact) processing. What are future structures and materials to maintain progress in integrated electronics? MOS front-end and back-end process integration.
Prerequisites: MIC501 Micro/Nano Processing Technology, and MIC503 Integrated Microelectronic Devices, or equivalents


MIC622  Integrated Circuit Fabrication Laboratory – 3 credits
The course involves CMOS process simulation using SPROCESS, laboratory fabrication, testing and characterization of silicon gate CMOS devices and simple integrated circuits. Emphasis is on the practical aspects of IC fabrication, including silicon wafer cleaning, photolithography, etching, oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, chemical vapor deposition, physical sputtering and wafer testing.
Specifically the course is divided in three parts:

  • CMOS fabrication for silicon integrated circuits.
  • CMOS process simulation using SPROCESS
  • Device testing and characterization.

Prerequisites: MIC501 Micro/Nano Processing Technology, and MIC503 Integrated Microelectronic Devices, or equivalents

MIC623  Nanoelectronics – 3 credits
To enable the continuing reduction of CMOS circuit cell size below the 11-nm technology node and deliver increased frequency per node, the discrete transistor devices that are employed in such circuits require novel structures and the introduction of mobility enhanced materials over Si. This course addresses this challenge by teaching the skills required in order to calculate the electronic properties in such devices starting from the description of the electrons at the nanoscale.
Prerequisites: MIC503 Integrated Microelectronic Devices, or equivalent


MIC624  The Physics of Solar Cells – 3 credits
This course covers the physics of solar cells: solar history, semiconductor fundamentals, p-n junction physics, mono-crystalline solar cells, thin film solar cells, managing light, new novel solar concepts, TCAD solar cells design and simulation.
Prerequisites: MIC501 Micro/Nano Processing Technology, and MIC503 Integrated Microelectronic Devices, or equivalents


MIC630  Fundamentals of Photonics –  3 credits
The field of photonics describes the use of light to perform functions that were traditionally under the domain of electronics, such as computing, data storage, information processing and telecommunications. In particular, silicon photonics allows the integration of optical and electronics devices on the same integrated microchip. This course covers the basic concepts needed for understanding, designing and simulating the basic passive building blocks for such photonic integrated circuits (PICs). A quick review of ray and wave optics is presented, along with electromagnetic wave propagation in isotropic media. Planar and two-dimensional dielectric waveguides are discussed, as well as an introduction to photonic crystals. The theory of ring resonators and optical add/drop multiplexers (OADM) is also presented, and some optical architectures for interconnects, routers and switches is explored. Advanced numerical simulations on MATLAB and MEEP (FDTD software) are also covered.
Prerequisites: MIC505 Electromagnetic and Applications, or equivalent with permission of the instructor, intermediate knowledge of calculus and MATLAB, basic knowledge of any programming language


MIC631  Computational Electrodynamics – 3 credits
This course covers principles and applications in electromagnetic device and material modeling and simulation. The most commonly used numerical methods for optical/microwave devices modeling are approached: finite-element, beam-propagation, finite-differences, finite-difference time-domain and boundary element methods. Also, application of finite-element and boundary element methods to quantum mechanics problems of technical interest is addressed.
Prerequisites: MIC505 Electromagnetic and Applications, or MSE509 Electrical, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials


MIC632  Photonic Materials and Devices –  3 credits
The field of photonics describes the generation, processing and detection of light. It encompasses applications in power generation and transmission, telecommunications, sensing, signal processing and data storage. This course covers the principles of photonic materials and devices, starting from a basic understanding of the effect of material properties on the electromagnetic radiation. Non-linear phenomena and their technological applications are presented. The optics of beams and guided waves are studied in various configurations. Optoelectronic interaction and its importance to source and detector design are also presented. Finally, some applications of photonics materials and devices in signal processing, modulation and sensing are shown.
Prerequisites: MIC630 Fundamentals of Photonics, and at least one of the following: MIC503 Integrated Microelectronic Devices or MSE509 Electrical, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials


MIC633  Photonic Sensors for Chemical, Biomedical and Environmental Applications – 3 credits
The course is focused on the achievement of a clear and rigorous understanding of the fundamental properties, concepts and theories which are of importance in photonic sensors.
Photonic sensor designs have been developed and demonstrated to have small footprint, light weight, high resolution, immunity to electromagnetic interference, harsh environment operational capability, “long-reach” access potential, multiplexing capability for certain sensor designs and low cost implementation attributes. Within this rapidly advancing field which includes light sources, fiber, optical signal modulation, and nano/micro scale structures, this course focuses on photonic components and system configurations needed for chemical, biological and environmental sensing applications.
Prerequisites: MIC630 Fundamental of Photonics, or MSE509 Electrical, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials, or equivalents


MIC634  Propagation and Generation of Light – 3 credits
The course discusses propagation of optical beams in free space, optical systems, and optical fibers, as well as generation of optical beams in lasers and optical resonators. The topics include: diffraction; Fourier optics; basic optical elements and systems (lenses, microscopes, diffraction gratings); Gaussian beams; Fabry-Perot interferometers; optical resonators; basics of light-matter interaction; principles of lasers; laser types; optical fibers; dispersion and nonlinearities in optical fibers; fiber amplifiers; fiber transmission systems.
Prerequisites: MIC630 Fundamental of Photonics, or equivalent, knowledge of basics of MATLAB


MIC635  Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices – 3 credits
This course covers optical properties of semiconductors; physics of absorption, spontaneous and stimulated emission. It discusses applications and current state-of-the-art in theory and design of semiconductor optoelectronic devices. Devices covered include photodetectors (p-i-n, avalanche, MSM), modulators (carrier injection, electroabsorption), light-emitting diodes (LEDs), semiconductor optical amplifiers and semiconductor lasers.
Prerequisites: MIC503 Integrated Microelectronic Devices, or equivalent, basic MATLAB for homework assignments


MIC636  Advanced Micro and Nanofabrication of Microsystems Devices – 3 credits
The state of the art in the microsystems device fabrication will be covered, from standard CMOS processes to niche advanced prototyping techniques of usage in new areas as photonics, MEMS, OMEMS, thin-film FETs and biosensors. Non-standard techniques such as pick-and-place, nanostructure self-assembly and holographic lithography will also be covered.
Prerequisites: MIC630 Fundamentals of Photonics, or equivalent


MIC637  Advanced Photonic Integrated Circuits Design – 3 credits
This course covers optical signal processing for photonic integrated circuits (PICs) and discusses state-of-the-art PIC components.  The primary focus is being placed on multi-stage filter design and synthesis. Minimum, maximum, and linear-phase filters, optical lattice filters, Fourier filters, and generalized pole-zero architecture.
Techniques such as least squares methods for IIR filter designs will be presented. State-of-the-art PIC examples including bandpass/bandstop filters, optical gain equalizer, dispersion compensators, and arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) routers will be discussed in depth. Also included Bragg grating synthesis algorithm using coupled-mode approach. System-level application examples to microwave photonics, sensor networks, and coherent optical detection will be given.
In addition to learning filter synthesis methods, students will gain a significant amount of experience in optimizing optical circuits at the subsystem level using Matlab and/or Labview. The above techniques will take into consideration process variations, wavelength, and polarization dependence.
Prerequisites: MIC504 Advanced Signal Processing, or equivalent, with permission of instructor

MIC640  Design and Fabrication of MEMS –  3 credits
This course covers topics such as material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. The goal of this course is to explore the world of microelectromechanical devices and systems (MEMS). This requires an awareness of material properties, fabrication technologies, basic structural mechanics, sensing and actuation principles, circuit and system issues, packaging, calibration, and testing. We will cover this through a combination of lectures, case studies, individual homework assignments, a take-home design problem, and design projects carried out in teams.
There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process.
Prerequisites: MIC501 Micro/Nano Processing Technology, MIC504 Advanced Signal Processing, and MIC505 Electromagnetic and Applications, or equivalents


MIC641 Materials and Processes for Microelectromechanical Devices and Systems – 3 credits
This course presents a unified treatment of key principles in materials and processing for design and manufacture of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). More emphasis is placed on materials and processes commonly used for fabrication for MEMS and not microelectronic systems. Topics covered will include: processing and properties of both thin and thick polycrystalline and amorphous films, wafer and thin film bonding, bulk micromachining techniques, and the relationships between processing and properties of active materials such as piezoelectrics, ferroelectrics and phase-transition materials. Key material properties and parameters and their relationships with microfabrication processes and applications are discussed, including elastic and inelastic deformation, fracture, residual stress, fatigue, creep, adhesion, stiction, and coupled-field constitutive behavior. Materials and process selection and case studies of applications provide a unifying theme. 
Prerequisites: MIC501 Micro/Nano Processing Technology


MIC650  Computer-Aided Design of Microelectronic Systems – 3 credits
This course provides a graduate-level coverage of major topics in computer-aided design of microelectronic systems. Its main objective is to endow students with an up-to-date perspective on the development and implementation of methodologies and tools for the design and integration of large-scale digital and mixed-signal microelectronic systems. Its coverage spans the traditional electronic design automation (EDA) areas of logic synthesis, physical synthesis, and layout verification as well as areas that arise in the context of chip integration such as clock-tree synthesis, power-grid analysis and synthesis, and chip-package co-design. The course will also familiarize the students with the major CAD environments in the microelectronic industry and the pressing R&D issues currently facing independent EDA vendors and corporate CAD houses.
Prerequisites: MIC502 Digital Systems Laboratory, or MIC610 Analysis and Design of Digital Integrated Circuits, or equivalent, knowledge of graph algorithms will be helpful but not needed


MIC651  Numerical Simulation of Circuits and Systems – 3 credits
This course covers general theory and concepts related to numerical simulation of circuits and systems.  As a review, circuit networks are reviewed along with nodal, transient, and frequency analysis.  Basic linear algebra is reviewed along with state space description of systems. Iterative methods (Gauss-Seidel, Gauss-Jacobi, Krylov) for solving linear systems. DC solution of non-linear circuits (Newton’s algorithm). Numerical solution of non-linear ordinary differential equations (first order and higher-order methods).  Adaptive time stepping techniques and error analysis. Behavioral modeling techniques are then introduced, along with a review of classical feedback systems. Constant time step techniques are presented for linear nodal analysis as well as block-by-block computation techniques.
Prerequisites: MIC504 Advanced Signal Processing, or equivalent, with permission of instructor


MIC660 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics – 3 credits
This course covers elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics. It explores applied quantum physics as well as emphasizes experimental basis for quantum mechanics. The course prepares students to apply Schrodinger's equation to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom; variational methods; and topics on elementary statistical physics including Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Boltzmann distribution functions. Simple models for metals, semiconductors, and devices such as electron microscopes, scanning tunneling microscope, thermionic emitters, atomic force microscope are also covered.
Prerequisites: MIC503 Integrated Microelectronic Devices, or MIC612 High Speed Communications Circuit, or equivalents, with permission of instructor


MIC661  Physics and Manufacturability of Advanced Microfabrication – 3 credits
This course presents advanced physical models and practical aspects of front-end microfabrication processes, such as oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, etching, and epitaxy. It covers topics relevant to CMOS, bipolar, and optoelectronic device fabrication, including high k gate dielectrics, gate etching, implant-damage enhanced diffusion, advanced metrology, stress effects on oxidation, SiGe and fabrication of process-induced strained Si. BEOL The course discusses integration and reliability. It includes CMOS process integration concepts studies and impacts of processing on device characteristics and design space. Students use modern process simulation tools. Yield modeling and manufacturability vs. process complexity balancing.
Prerequisites: MIC501 Micro/Nano Processing Technology, MIC503 Integrated Microelectronic Devices, MIC622 Integrated Circuit Fabrication Laboratory, or MIC621

Space Concentration

The Master’s Concentration in Space Systems and Technology at Masdar Institute aims to produce post-graduate students with the multi-disciplinary preparation that meets the following goals:

  • an ability to identify and address current and future engineering problems related to energy sources, generation, conversion and industrial processes within a broader framework of sustainable development;
  • an ability to apply a multi-disciplinary approach to conceive, plan, design, and implement solutions to engineering problems in the fields of energy and sustainability;
  • an understanding of the impact of solutions to engineering problems in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context;
  • an understanding of the value of technical and scientific research, service to society, leadership and life-long learning required to further their career aspirations.

In addition to the Microsystems Engineering Program specific core courses and the University Core Course, space concentration students are supposed to take the following space concentration core courses:

  • SSC501: Spacecraft Systems and Design
  • SSC502: Spacecraft Systems Lab 1
  • SSC503: Spacecraft Systems Lab 2
  • SSC504: Spacecraft Systems Lab 3     

Year 1: Fall Semester

 

MSc Program Specific Core Course 1

3

MSc Program Specific Core Course 2

3

Space Core Course (SSC501: Spacecraft Systems and Design)

3

Master's Thesis Work related to space technology

3

Year 1: Spring Semester

 

MSc Program Specific Core Course 3

3

MSc Program Specific Core Course 4

3

SSC502: Space Systems Lab-1

1

Master's Thesis Work related to space technology

3

Year 1: Summer

 

Master's Thesis Work related to space technology

6

Year 2: Fall Semester

 

Technical Elective relevant to space technology

3

MI Core Course: (UCC501: Sustainable Energy)

3

SSC503: Space Systems Lab-2

1

Master's Thesis Work related to space technology

6

Year 2: Spring Semester

 

SSC504: Space Systems Lab-3

1

Master's Thesis Work related to space technology

6

TOTAL CREDITS

48


In addition to the Microsystems Engineering Program learning outcomes, program students in the space concentration are also expected to attain the following concentration specific outcomes:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in the aspects of space systems design and analysis; and
  • Design and build a small-satellite as a part of a multi-disciplinary team